Weather or not

Wet. Too wet. And not an isolated feature I’m afraid. Great swaths of the corn and soy belt remain unplanted. Tomorrow is the first of June, corn planted this late will not yield what it might have had it been planted a month ago… though this assertion does assume the remaining parts of the season might be somewhat ‘normal’. Soybean yields will be affected by later plantings now as well – though typically not to the same extent as corn.

Not impressed with Mother Nature’s vicissitudes? How about a tornado? There’s a storm to respect. And we’ve had that too. Well, not me exactly… but a colleague. Jim lives less than a quarter mile from one of the recent tornado landings here in Ohio. His house and property were spared. Neighbors on the next street over were not as lucky. We did spend hours in the basement. The worry of the unknown makes the whole event surreal.

Earlier this evening the radio played Bob Dylan’s Shelter from the Storm. Most inspiring. And another song I’ll play yet is Credence Clearwater Revival’s Who’ll Stop the Rain. For now though let me share with you a couple verses of my own, inspired by BD’s poetry… his verses one and four:

‘Twas in another lifetime, one of toil and blood
When blackness was a virtue the road was full of mud
I came in from the wilderness, a creature void of form
Come in, she said
I’ll give ya shelter from the storm

I was burned out from exhaustion, buried in the hail
Poisoned in the bushes an’ blown out on the trail
Hunted like a crocodile, ravaged in the corn
Come in, she said
I’ll give ya shelter from the storm

My spin on it:

Shelter from the storm - Clem's lyrics

Snow beans Woodstock, November 2018 - cropped

Snow and soybeans – not a good mix.  A Mother’s vicissitude. 

 

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5 comments

  1. There go the commodity prices for our hog feed this fall.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You could always raise your own… and the corn price has already gone up about 10%

      With African Swine Fever running rampant (outside the US for now) the pork you do raise should be worth more.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Actually we have dropped our pork production, which was never much in the big scheme, by 75%. The movement towards local is waning. Customers are willing to buy local if it is available at the supermarket…and at big ag prices. Everyone raves about the taste of our pork but few buy. And considering we have held ours at $3.50 a pound hanging weight for ten years tells a tale. It certainly is an inconvenience to buy a side of pork with the freezer space needed. But ten years ago they lined up. Not so anymore. The upside is we paid the farm off years ago when replacement cattle prices were low and finished beef prices high. Those were good days.

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    1. Farming, like growing old – not for the faint of heart. But life in broader strokes is always a challenge. Make the best of it.

      Freezer space can certainly be a constraint. And the trend toward convenience meals even at home cuts into how willing folks are to prepare meals from scratch. Better flavors and better nutrition have a tough time getting their share of the pie when competing with cheap and simple.

      Good days have a way of circling back from time to time. Holding out until they return is crucial.

      At $3.50 a pound hanging weight from the locker you are marketing sides? Two customers per pig? How do you divide things like heart, and tongue? I’m guessing there is minimal processing – chops cut out, wrapping, some ground pork but no sausage??

      On the Saturday before Easter here there were spiral sliced hams on sale at a grocer in town for $0.87 a pound – straight up, no coupons, no membership cards. I think they just needed to get them out the door before they ended up eating them. Got one, cut it up to freeze some and make meals from the rest. Bizarre. Somewhere people are hungry, and elsewhere good food is being tossed at us just so it doesn’t go to waste. One imagines we might be smarter than this.

      Like

  3. One imagines.

    Like

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