A team effort

There was an upper level management meeting here at Gulliver’s Pulse just the other day. The principals gathered round to review our performance metrics and sketch out plans for coming articles. Lemuel was rather diplomatic in his chiding my slacking performance in the second half of July. The Bucket was his usual self… impatiently popping in now and again with his suggestions and his hopes to offer content. With no hands to speak of you’d still be forgiven imagining him waving an arm in the air to be called on like the little 3rd grader who knows an answer and just won’t be denied.

The second half of July here was wonderful for catching up in the fields. We’d been overly wet before and forced from the fields. With a chance to be in the fields we were unable to spend sufficient time preparing materials for the site. Lemuel, as worldly as he is, was understanding and patient. But his patience is not boundless. To get back to some semblance of production the three of us have agreed to co-produce a piece now and from time to time there will be contributions from my partners snuck into the typical drivel I’m capable of.

On the front burner is a piece on gleaning, and hopefully not too far off some reflections on Laudato si (Pope Francis’ latest encyclical). Values of a grain/legume diet should be also be discussed before this growing season winds down. I have a copy of Contested Agronomy sitting on the desk and while I’ve only made a respectable start I do have a feeling there are at least a couple posts worth of comment to offer on this. Lemuel’s patience may be tested waiting for this latter effort however, as I’ve a feeling the harvest will be upon us before I’m ready to offer something worthwhile.

So for the present installment the board has agreed that original content is not as significant as declaring a few ‘coming soon’ teasers and then finishing up with some quotations Lemuel and I have found particularly enlightening. The Bucket has assembled a new list of ‘wonderings’ and with some trepidation Lemuel and I have agreed to add a couple here. In the future we may append one of TB’s wonderings at the end of normal content. Compromise can be messy.

So, Lemuel, your first quote:

  The latter part of a wise person’s life is occupied with curing the follies, prejudices and false opinions they contracted earlier.

Jonathan Swift

Interesting. Ok, my turn:

Things may come to those who wait, but only the things left by those who hustle.

Abraham Lincoln

All right TB, you can offer one of your ‘wonderings’:

Would a teensy tiny little sandwich of steak tartare in Tijuana be a mosquito burrito?  

Quick Lemuel, something please:

Every man desires to live long, but no man wishes to be old.

Jonathan Swift

Hmmmm, do I sense a pattern?

Then I’ll return to my favorite President:

In the end, it’s not the years in your life that count.  It’s the life in your years.

Abraham Lincoln

Yes TB? No, that’s not what we agreed to. Please sit still. A quote? Well, ok, you may offer a quote:

Anger is an acid that can do more harm to the vessel in which it is stored than to anything on which it is poured.

Mark Twain

Very nice. Much appreciated.

Some thoughts to ponder. Not our own, but if we were as erudite we’d likely be better engaged.

_________________________________________________________________________

TB, still wondering:  Is the last sip of your carbonated soft drink a soda coda?

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2 comments

  1. Good one by Twain. There are depths within his depths. I’ve been plumbing the “Aunt Polly is mighty particular about how this…gets painted” for years. I’ve only begun to scratch the surface of the ways in which in can be applied to the gulli… I mean co-workers or visitors to the farm.

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    1. Yes, MT is fantastic at many levels. Have been a big fan for many decades. Tom Sawyer is precious for all ages. Huck Finn might be best kept for slightly older audiences, but is in my opinion one the of the greatest assemblages of English words on the planet. I think we’ve touched on this notion before, but there really was a different fashion for expressing one’s self in the nineteenth century. Would that someone could step forward and write at that level once again.

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